Yeshua

Come And See

When Yeshua called his first disciples, he asked them, "What do you seek?" When they reply, he tells them, "Come and see." Emet HaTorah director, Darren Huckey, explores this very Jewish response of Yeshua and how he is still asking his disciples the same question today. This teaching is intended to have us zoom back out at the bigger picture of what it means to be a disciple of Yeshua and why understanding him on his terms is critical for our spiritual development.

Tonight: Suffering. Tomorrow: Victory.

Tonight: Suffering. Tomorrow: Victory.

A Passover Devotion

Reading: Exodus 12:21 - 12:51 & Numbers 28:16 - 28:25

Parashat Vayikra - Leviticus 1:1-5:26

No Sacrifice For Sin

I can’t help but get excited when I begin studying the book of Leviticus. It’s an amazing book that deals with a wide range of topics, but has a primary focus on the levitical functions that take place within the Tabernacle. It wastes no time getting into its subject matter and immediately begins by discussing the details for the olah, or the whole burnt offering. From there it begins explaining the various aspects of each of the types of offerings that a person may bring to the LORD. 

Parashat Vayakhel-Pekudei (Exodus 35:1 - 40:38)

An Eternal Priesthood

What comes to mind when you hear someone speak of an “eternal priesthood”? If you are a disciple of Yeshua, then Yeshua’s ministry automatically comes to mind. As the book of Hebrews says, he is a high priest forever, continually ministering before his Heavenly Father on our behalf:

Parashat Mishpatim - Exodus 21:1-24:18

An Eye For An Eye. Literally?

Upon a cursory reading of the Torah some of the laws contained within it seem not only a bit harsh, but even barbaric at times. This week’s Torah portion contains laws that seem to fall into that category and tend to make the modern reader uncomfortable. One of the passages is related to personal damages caused by physical violence:

You shall pay life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, burn for burn, wound for wound, stripe for stripe. (Exodus 21:25)

Parashat Mattot-Massei: Numbers 30:2-36:13

Adding To The Scriptures

Many people take objection to the concept of rabbinic authority and the corpus of Jewish law, which includes the Mishnah and Talmud. They see these rabbinic works as “adding” manmade laws to the Scriptures, because indeed they contain countless laws that do not seem to appear in the Scriptures themselves. Therefore, these rabbinic works are seen as violating one of the primary principles of Scripture, to not add to the Scripture. The prooftext for this prohibition is found in Deuteronomy:

Parashat Acharei Mot-Kedoshim - Leviticus 16:1-20:27

This week’s double portion of Acharei Mot and Kedoshim covers a lot of ground in a small amount of space. It covers the ritual of Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement), restrictions on where and how sacrifices can be made, proscriptions for the resident alien, a list of prohibited sexual relations, a stern reminder about honoring one’s parents, issues of social justice, a detailed explanation of how to love one’s neighbor, and a miscellaneous list of other commandments ranging from agricultural laws to prohibitions against sorcery and child sacrifice.

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